Barn Swallows

Yesterday these two Barn Swallows were hanging out on a fence near a lake where we took an afternoon walk. Nice to see them back in town and their colors are sure vibrant right now. Soon after these photos were shot they took off and were buzzing around the lake hunting for bugs which is always an amazing sight to observe.

Sage Thrasher

We watched and mostly listened as this male Sage Thrasher sang his long and complex song from the top a the sage brush on a quiet dirt road.

According to All About Birds “males have long, complex, melodic songs, with remarkable variety. The rambling series of phrases, often preceded by soft clucking notes, is continuous and interspersed with moments of repetition and mimicry. Songs can be very long indeed; one male was recorded singing for 22 minutes straight.”

While this guys song was not a whopping 22 minutes it did go on and on leaving me out of breath just listening.

 

Pinyon Jay

While getting ready to go for a hike a while ago we were pleased to have the company of numerous Pinyon Jays buzzing about in the parking area collecting seeds.

According to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology Pinyon Jays are highly social birds of the lower mountain slopes of the western United States, the Pinyon Jay is specialized for feeding on pine seeds. Each jay stores thousands of seeds each year, and has such a good memory that it can remember where most of them were hidden.

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Pinyon_Jay/id

Now if only I could bottle that kind of memory and take a sip every morning I might never forget where I placed my keys.

 

Almost But Not Quite

Almost But Not Quite

Almost but not quite. Red Winged Blackbirds are back in town but the shoulder badges on the males are not quite a vibrant red and the sky is still a bit grey and wintery this day. Almost, but not quite, spring is indeed in the air. I can hear this blackbird singing.