Northern Flicker

A quick visit with a Northern Flicker. This fine looking bird flew into a tree filled with a mixed flock of small songbirds foraging away on a cold November morning and we are glad she did.

She made a quick check to see what all the commotion was about checking to see if there was food of her liking on and old fir tree.

But alas, after a quick check of both limbs and trunk she decided to move on. A nice splash of color on a quiet fall day.

American Three Toed Woodpecker: Picoides dorsalis

While out on a hike we followed the sound of a woodpecker pecking in the forest fully expecting to find a Downy Head or Hairy. When we finally spotted the source of the pecking we were thrilled to find an American Three Toed Wooedepcker: Picoides dorsalis working away looking for a meal. Why this species evolved to have only three toes instead of the typical four seems to be a matter for debate however the Cornell Lab of Ornithology suggest that three toes may help deliver stronger blows with the beak while foraging.

White-Crowned Sparrow

Perched in the willows along a mountain lake a White-crowned Sparrow enjoys the autumn sunrise. Photographed over two months ago yet it feels like just yesterday.

D0 you ever get the feeling that time sure seems to speed along at different rates sometime slow and sometimes fast yet always marching on?

Have another wonderful weekend.

Score

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Finding food sure can be hard work. Which reminds us it’s time to put out the feeder for these guys as winter is heading our way.

We were watching this House Sparrow search intently through the gravel and forest debris and score with what appears to be a tasty little seed.

A bite well earned.

Everybody loves Rabbit Brush

Just a few weeks ago the Rabbit Brush was in full bloom and hosting quite a party where everyone was invited. Rabbit Brush is a native plant found over much of the western United States that blooms in late fall providing one final burst of color before winter arrives. According to the USDA, Rabbit Brush:Chrysothamnus viscidiflorus, provides both nesting habitat and forage for a wide variety of birds, insects and small mammals. One of the more frequent visitors to the party were White Crowned Sparrows.

In this case an immature White-Crowned Sparrow seemed to be foraging for insects.

Another visitor we noticed on more than one occasion was the Monarch Butterly stopping by for a sip of nectar as they migrate south for the winter.

Last but not least the Ruby-crowned Kinglets found the party too good to ignore and we frequently saw them foraging through the bushes in each of a meal.

A beautiful plant and a welcome splash of color as snow is forecast for the weekend.

And speaking of weekends, have a great one.