Between Shadows

The light just seems to change so fast this time of year. One second this beautiful White-crowned Sparrow was out in the light the next second in a shadow. Somehow we always seem to get them in-between the two and this day was no exception. A nice look, a nice bird and a nice way to start the week.

A Harriers Flight

Elegant and precise are words that always seem to come to mind when watching Northern Harriers fly the fields in search of a meal. The Northern Harrier is a very distinct looking hawk hawk with their owl-like face and easily identifiable in flight by a white patch at the base of their tails.

Northern Harriers are the most owl-like of hawks (though they’re not related to owls). They rely on hearing as well as vision to capture prey. The disk-shaped face looks and functions much like an owl’s, with stiff facial feathers helping to direct sound to the ears.

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Harrier/overview

Northern Harriers hunt mostly small mammals and small birds, but they are capable of taking bigger prey like rabbits and ducks. They sometimes subdue larger animals by drowning them.

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Harrier/overview

North American Badger: Taxidea taxus


Out on a hike amongst the fully blooming rabbit and sage brush we noticed numerous holes along the trail. Were they Marmot or perhaps Badger. Finally near the end of the hike the question was answered when we spotted this Badger off in the distance.

It was nice to see this Badger out foraging.

Badgers dig after and feed on ground squirrels and pocket gophers, and also eat toads, frogs, birds, snakes, insects and insect grubs, wasps, bees, and worms. They sleep through most of the winter in a den, spending about 29 hours at a time in a state of torpor, rousing briefly, and then sleeping again. In torpor, which is not true hibernation, the Badger’s heartbeat slows to about half the normal rate and its temperature drops.


Even with this great camouflage the Badger is at risk mostly from human activities such as habitat loss as well as hunting and trapping.

Enjoy your winter Mr. badger and we will see you after your Torpor.