Into the sunset

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Two mule deer fawns head off into the sunset through fields of sunflowers and balsam root with grasses just tall enough to easily slip out of sight when need be. They were not alone this evening as Mom was just ahead leading and teaching these two little ones the ways of Mule Deer life as they quietly slipped off into the sunset.

On green grass

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A Western White Butterfly taking a bit of a rest on the green green grasses growing in a field nearby. Spring has sure done it’s job this year as the grasses have grown up tall. It’s only a matter of time and the mid-summer heat before they will seed and turn towards brown. It all happened in what seems a blink of an eye this year and it sometimes feels hard to drink it all in.

Triteleia Grandiflora

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One of the more unusual wildflowers we see each summer is Triteleia Grandiflora.

The tall slender stalk with only one or two basal leaves spring up out of grassy areas and are capped with a cluster of delicate yet hardy and unusual looking purple-blue flowers.

A native to the pacific northwest east of the cascade mountains from Oregon into Montana, Wyoming, Utah and Idaho. We have see it growing in open Prairies and up into mountain foothills. Usually it seems that each plant is widely spaced from it’s neighbors or many times we see a single plant spring up far from others of its own species.

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It’s always fun to photograph these each spring and this years we have noticed greater numbers of Triteleia Grandiflora blooming than in the previous years.

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Chestnut-Backed Chickadee

Hearing the Chickadees calling in the trees above our heads we expected to look up and see either a black-capped or mountain chickadee as we had seen them earlier this day. However to our surprise we we greeted by this little Chestnut-Backed Chickadee looking down at us and hunting insects just above our heads.

The all about birds website starts their description of this bird by calling them handsome and I would have to whole heartedly agree with that.

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Chestnut-backed_Chickadee/id

Fresh from the fields

While strolling the fields to see who’s there we found a handful of newcomers that will be gone in the blink of an eye.

Some in small patches and some stand alone. Some out in the open while some hide along the forest edge.
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A nice patch of Parry’s Townsend Daisies seem to shine even without the sunlight on a cloudy afternoon.

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This beautiful flower (identified with the help of troutlily57) is a Death Camus. All parts of this wildflower contain toxic chemicals (alkaloids) said to be more potent than strychnine…yikes.

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I think this small beauty is in the Phlox family. Yet the specific species needs further investigation.

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Finally a beautiful Chocolate Lilly. These are always somewhat sparse and this year the flower seem unusually small.

All beautiful finds and fresh from the fields close to home.