Rocky Mountain Bee Plant: Cleome serrulata

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Rocky Mountain Bee Plant: Cleome serrulata was a wonderful late blooming wildflower near us this year. It drew numerous species of bees, and butterflies, from near and far and always had visitors when in bloom providing pollinators with a generous sip of nectar.

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Growing up to 4 ft tall Bee Plant stands out in the fields of tall fall grasses.A beautiful and very sculptural wildflower Bee Plant is fun to photograph as well.

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According to the USDA “Cleome serrulata is an important cultural plant for many Southwestern Indian tribes. The young, tender shoots and leaves are good sources of vitamin A and calcium. In the past they were used as potherbs or medicinally as teas for fevers and other ailments. The seeds were ground and used to make gruel or bread. The Navajo still use the plant as a source of yellow-green dye for their beautiful wool rugs and blankets. Many pueblo tribes use a concentrated form of dye, made from boiling the plant into a thick black resin, to paint designs on pottery or for decorating their baskets.”

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On this particular afternoon the little green sweat bees were enjoying the plant to no end.

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Every flower seems to have a visitor.

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And one last look as even the bee fly mimics got in on the action.

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Whispers in green

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Yellow whispers in a big old sea of green.

That is what this Yellow Columbine felt like on a recent hike into the forests nearby. A rainier than typical spring and early summer has the forest looking green as green can be and even a large patch of Columbine growing strong could only mustard a whisper in that sea of green yet sometimes a whispers is all you need.

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Fresh from the fields

While strolling the fields to see who’s there we found a handful of newcomers that will be gone in the blink of an eye.

Some in small patches and some stand alone. Some out in the open while some hide along the forest edge.
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A nice patch of Parry’s Townsend Daisies seem to shine even without the sunlight on a cloudy afternoon.

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This beautiful flower (identified with the help of troutlily57) is a Death Camus. All parts of this wildflower contain toxic chemicals (alkaloids) said to be more potent than strychnine…yikes.

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I think this small beauty is in the Phlox family. Yet the specific species needs further investigation.

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Finally a beautiful Chocolate Lilly. These are always somewhat sparse and this year the flower seem unusually small.

All beautiful finds and fresh from the fields close to home.

Purple

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Today is Purple day. Don’t ask me why…it just is. So on that note a smattering of purple wildflowers seen on various hikes not too far from home.

Above a field of Lupine sparkles on a rainy morning walk.

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A purple Monkey flower added to the bouquet.

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A Purple Pulsitila hanging just right.

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And to top it all off Larkspur is another fine addition to the collection of local wildflowers blooming this time of year.

Many different shades but all of them say purple to a tee.

Yellow

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Mostly yellow and just a touch of green on a cloudy spring afternoon.

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Yellow bells ringing and although short and sometimes hidden in the grass they make a statement that is always bold.

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Arrow-leaf Balsamroot is just now riding into town and when in full abundance paints the fields with that sunny shade of yellow.

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Now on the wane yet still holding on the Biscuit root is one of those flowers inside a flower inside a flower. Fascinating to look at from macro to micro and back again.

Have a wonderful weekend.