Prickly Poppies

Prickly Poppies are a wonderful wildflower to have around. On our daily walks we can rest assured we will find some in bloom. Once found,  we can stop for a moment and enjoy the show as beetles, bees and ants do their work pollinating these delicate flowers. Even now, as fall approaches and most of the other wildflowers have lost their blooms, a few Prickly Poppies are still going strong.

They a treat for they eyes, like little whipped cream sundaes with a cherries on top.

Those little prickles protect such delicate yet tough flowers.

I am looking forward to see how long they continue blooming into the fall.

https://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/plant-of-the-week/argemone_pleiacantha.shtml

Denver, CO

Blurple

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Rocky Mountain Penstemon.

Are they Blue?

Are they Purple?

Oh Heck, let’s just call them Blurple. Seeing them growing wild in the fields or in the garden around they house  always bring a smile to our faces.

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We are not sure there can be a more saturated color and the sculptural beauty just leaves one shaking their head.

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Blowing on the breeze as summer lingers on.

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And the bees dig them as well.

Happy Monday and have a great week ahead.

Like Music

Like_music_001A field of flowers like notes on a staff creating a not only a sight but filling the ears with a harmonious sound.

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There are indeed times when the wildflowers sing. Like music, your favorite music.

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A feast for the ears as well as the eyes.

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Sagebrush Buttercups: Ranunculus glaberrimus

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Just down the road, where the sun hits just right, is a small patch of earth warmed by the sun where the snow has melted and the Sagebrush Buttercups are already springing to life.

Growing low to the ground with their buttery shiny-waxy petals these wonderful little flowers are a challenge to photograph yet fun nonetheless. They are a bit poisonous to the touch so take care if handling them as they can cause blistering.

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While a few were blooming most we still just on their way.

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A wonderful sign that spring is indeed on it’s way despite the recent snows.

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Rocky Mountain Bee Plant: Cleome serrulata

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Rocky Mountain Bee Plant: Cleome serrulata was a wonderful late blooming wildflower near us this year. It drew numerous species of bees, and butterflies, from near and far and always had visitors when in bloom providing pollinators with a generous sip of nectar.

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Growing up to 4 ft tall Bee Plant stands out in the fields of tall fall grasses.A beautiful and very sculptural wildflower Bee Plant is fun to photograph as well.

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According to the USDA “Cleome serrulata is an important cultural plant for many Southwestern Indian tribes. The young, tender shoots and leaves are good sources of vitamin A and calcium. In the past they were used as potherbs or medicinally as teas for fevers and other ailments. The seeds were ground and used to make gruel or bread. The Navajo still use the plant as a source of yellow-green dye for their beautiful wool rugs and blankets. Many pueblo tribes use a concentrated form of dye, made from boiling the plant into a thick black resin, to paint designs on pottery or for decorating their baskets.”

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On this particular afternoon the little green sweat bees were enjoying the plant to no end.

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Every flower seems to have a visitor.

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And one last look as even the bee fly mimics got in on the action.

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Whispers in green

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Yellow whispers in a big old sea of green.

That is what this Yellow Columbine felt like on a recent hike into the forests nearby. A rainier than typical spring and early summer has the forest looking green as green can be and even a large patch of Columbine growing strong could only mustard a whisper in that sea of green yet sometimes a whispers is all you need.

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