Inching along

Inching along from top of the plant down enjoying a meal along the way.

Caterpillars seemed so common in my youth but even while out and about most every day their numbers seem small. Perhaps it’s our location but maybe not. We were excited to find two species inching along on a late fall day. Both similar yet very distinct.

So mysterious and wonderful these creatures seem in a life of transformations.

Inching along until their next incarnation.

Oh Deer

Just a few family portraits of mom and the kids. We were lucky enough to have them spend the last month or two hanging around our area. A treat to sit and watch as the kids grow up they kept us active as well as much time was spent shooing them away from the garden.

One the the youngsters caught eyeing a nice patch of late-blooming flowers.

While their sibling snacks on wild sunflower seeds.

It’s hard to not smile at a face so cute but turn your back for a second and the petunias are toast.

Western Moss-heather: Cassiope mertensiana

Western Moss-heather is a beautiful plant that grows high up in the alpine environment in northwestern United States, Alaska and Canada. We happened across a nice patch flowering a few weeks ago.

Beautiful little bells hanging from redish stems with the plants growing about 4-5 inches tall at most.

Some patches almost seems to be growing directly out of the rocks along this wind whipped slope.

A flower we don’t encounter every summer on our hikes but one we will always remember.

One last alpine garden

A few weeks ago we we lucky enough to take a hike along a ridge above tree-line once again filled with alpine wildflower. Most growing only inches tall yet the display of color was stunning.

Carefully stepping from rock to rock to avoid smashing these fragile flowers that somehow thrive in a cold and windy environment.

Where sunflowers and lupine grown only inches tall.

While other flower grew as if they were the earth itself.

Happy Friday and wishing you a wonderful weekend.

Just a handful

A Milbert’s Tortoiseshell Butterfly sips sweet nectar on an August afternoon. While many of the butterflies we see are present in great numbers through the summer there are some we only see a handful of and then only for a few weeks at the most. The Milbert’s is one of them.

Another not so frequent observation is the Red Admiral.

The Pink-Edged Sulphur is always one of the most skittish and elusive of butterflies for us to photograph each summer. They seem to have that sixth sense and fly away even before we can get within range.

Another butterfly we only see a handful of each summer is not a butterfly at all but a moth. The Police-car Moth to be exact.